Tokyo Reimagined

Yutaka Takanashi, from the series Tokyo-jin (Tokyoites), 1965 
© the artist and courtesy MOMAT and DNPartcom
Yutaka Takanashi, from the series Tokyo-jin (Tokyoites), 1965 
© the artist and courtesy MOMAT and DNPartcom

As Japan’s capital transformed, Yutaka Takanashi deployed a radical style to picture urban change.

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Larry Sultan’s California Home Theater

Larry Sultan, Sunset, from the series Pictures from Home, 1989© Estate of Larry Sultan and courtesy Casemore Kirkeby
Larry Sultan, Sunset, from the series Pictures from Home, 1989© Estate of Larry Sultan and courtesy Casemore Kirkeby

In the Bay Area photographer’s retrospective, family, home life, and American suburbia take center stage.

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Rich, Famous, and Faking it

Xue Qiwen, 43, in her Shanghai apartment, decorated with furniture from her favorite brand, Versace, 2005.
Xue Qiwen, 43, in her Shanghai apartment, decorated with furniture from her favorite brand, Versace, 2005.

For twenty-five years, Lauren Greenfield has chronicled the rise and fallout of consumerism and celebrity culture.

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Editor’s Note

by Daria Tuminas   A book with “cinematic flair”; “a quasicinematic, nonlinear narrative”; “raw, cinematic, stream-of-consciousness”—you hear these things about photobooks all the time. But what exactly is this cinematic aspect of these publications? And what is the relationship between cinema and the photobook at large? The historical interconnection goes back to the very beginning of both mediums. As Olivier Lugon points out in Between Still and Moving Images (2012), “already, before the advent of the Lumière cinematograph, paper had been the privileged medium for cinematic movement, from the plates of the phenakistoscope and the zoetrope, to cards for Mutoscope…

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A History of White Men in South Africa

Mikhael Subotzky, Maplank and Naomi, Pollsmoor Maximum
Security Prison, 2004  Courtesy Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg
Mikhael Subotzky, Maplank and Naomi, Pollsmoor Maximum
Security Prison, 2004  Courtesy Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg

In a new film, photographer Mikhael Subotzky takes on two hundred years of white masculinity.

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On the Edge of the American Dream

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DLA.12919_72-dpi

How have West Coast photographers subverted the mythology of California?

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Robert Adams on Gregory Halpern, ZZYZX

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D. H. Lawrence admired the American Southwest but found Southern California troubling: “In a way, it has turned its back on the world, and looks into the void Pacific. It is absolutely selfish, very empty, but not false.” Gregory Halpern records an aspect of what still seems to be its emptiness—a careless isolation from one another. The idea of community appears to be almost beyond our imagination. Halpern’s Southern California is, however, in another sense, far from empty. Despite our neglect of what we might improve—others’ lives, and the places we share—there is frequently evident an unorthodox beauty. No matter…

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2017 Aperture Portfolio Prize Shortlist

Prize_Shortlist_featured
Prize_Shortlist_featured

Presenting the five finalists for the 2017 Aperture Portfolio Prize, an international photography competition.

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Guilty Pleasures/Hidden Treasures: Darius Himes and Frish Brandt

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              Darius Himes on Robert Spector The Pizza Hut Story Melcher Media and IPHFHA New York and Wichita, KS, 2008 The official geographic center of the continental United States of America is in Lebanon, Kansas, a mere 199 miles from Wichita, the birthplace of Pizza Hut. It somehow seems fitting that a chain restaurant with such national (and global) reach emanated from smack-dab in the center of the country. In 1958, the Carney brothers borrowed $600 from their mother to open a restaurant after seeing an article in the Saturday Evening Post about a…

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