Thomas R. Schiff
The Library Exhibition

Schiff-04-for-web
Schiff-04-for-web

Description: The library is at the heart of American cultural life. From the humble libraries of the eighteenth century—the first public lending library, which Benjamin Franklin helped found, and Thomas Jefferson’s library at Monticello, for example—to the thrilling edifices of twenty-first-century America, libraries express the social and civic ideals of their moment. Public spaces in which all members of the community are invited to learn, they also stand as monuments to the potential of our civilization. Thomas R. Schiff traces the history of America’s libraries by describing them in the manner their founders and architects intended, shaped into sweeping panoramas…

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Feast for the Eyes: The Story of Food in Photography
Curated by Susan Bright and Denise Wolff

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weston_feature

Denise Wolff on “Feast for the Eyes” by Susan Bright (Aperture, 2017) from Aperture Foundation on Vimeo. Photographs of food are rarely just about food. They hold our lives and time up to the light. Food can signify a lifestyle or a nation, hope or despair, hunger or excess. Ultimately, food is not only about literal taste, but also Taste with a capital T—both the lifestyles we aspire to and the building blocks of culture itself. —Susan Bright From basic sustenance to decadent feasts, food awakens the senses and touches both private and public life. Eating is one of the…

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Duane Hanson Polaroids: 1979 – 1994

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sunbather_crop

© The Estate of Duane Hanson/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY Duane Hanson, known for his hyperrealist sculptures of everyday people and the down-and-out, used photography as a primary means of developing his vision. With a meticulous eye, Hanson shot a series of Polaroids to sketch out his sculptures, photographing his subjects in subtle gestures looking for the pose that felt most real. He looked for the perfect tweak of the hand or shift of the gaze that would bring him closer to conceiving the end result, a sculpture that was both an unbelievably lifelike person and simultaneously a broader…

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Masquerade
Photographs by Phyllis Galembo

Cora_Mexico_small
Cora_Mexico_small

  © Phyllis Galembo Masquerade is a survey of over two decades of work documenting masquerade events, including the best of Galembo’s works from Africa and the African Diaspora as well as never-before-exhibited photographs from Mexico and India. Galembo’s vibrant photographs probe the questions of the evolution and survival of “traditional” mask-making practices in societies pressured by the effects of colonialism, secularization, Christianity, and Islam. In Africa, they portray participants in events ranging from a coming-of-age ritual for boys in Zambia to a Fancy Dress Festival in Ghana in which masqueraders parade as Santas, cowboys, matadors, and other everyday types….

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Muse: Mickalene Thomas Photographs and tête-à-tête

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La-Leçon-d'amour-hr

  © Mickalene Thomas; courtesy the artist, Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Description: Mickalene Thomas, known for her large-scale, multi-textured, and rhinestone-encrusted paintings of domestic interiors and portraits, has also identified the photographic image as a defining touchstone for her practice. Thomas first began to photograph herself and her mother as a student at Yale—a pivotal experience for her as an artist. While working across multiple series, much of her photographic work functions as a personal act of deconstruction and reappropriation— both of images she has created herself and images she…

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In Good Time
Photographs by Doug DuBois

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dd5

Doug DuBois approaches his work slowly, engaging in long-term photographic projects and telling stories. Some are specific, but like all good stories, they resonate with viewers in a myriad of personal and intimate ways. The Hermès Foundation and Aperture Foundation are pleased to present the exhibition In Good Time, the first mid-career survey of DuBois’ photographs, curated by Cory Jacobs. Family is a recurring theme in DuBois’ work. For his first and longest series, All the Days and Nights, which spanned more than twenty years, he photographed his own. Beginning in 1984, he traced the complicated and nuanced relationships that…

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Aperture: Photographs

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ubsfeat

Description: Aperture was originally conceived, in 1952, to promote the appreciation of the art of photography. At first it published just Aperture magazine, but in the mid-1960s the Foundation launched both its book program and a limited-edition print program, as part of and in support of its publishing activities—becoming the leading American photography publisher of its generation. This exhibition tells the story of the evolution of the Foundation, through a display of photographs from its print and fundraising programs made over a period of fifty years. In the process, it charts the evolution of photography itself. The need for a…

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The Photographer’s Playdate
A day-long program of interactive activities

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playdate1

  Installation images from the Exploratorium in San Fransisco Description: In response to the publication The Photographer’s Playbook: 307 Assignments and Ideas, Aperture Foundation has designed a day-long program of interactive activities to engage your community in the playfulness of photography. Initially produced at Aperture Gallery in New York City and at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, The Photographer’s Playdate can be mounted as a community-based event by organizations ranging from small photography clubs to larger museums and art centers. The program is designed for the general public and suitable for all ages and abilities. This is the perfect opportunity for…

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James Mollison
Playground

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feature_image

Description: James Mollison’s exhibition, Playground, influenced by his own experiences being bullied in the schoolyard, gives us an international look at children at play. These photographs are from rich and poor schools with vastly different resource levels in countries including Bhutan, Bolivia, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Nepal, Norway, Sierra Leone, the United Kingdom, and the U.S. The photographs are accompanied by extended captions that tell of the conditions specific to each school. Where some children are in classrooms so crowded that they need to climb over desks to move, others play in palace gardens. The comparison invites us…

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