Subversive Novelist Seeks Her Muse in Pictures

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09_Hujar_Joseph-Raffael-at-the-Botanical-Gardens,-1956

In San Francisco, the author of the controversial novel A Little Life stages an exhibition about loneliness and beauty.

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Photography is Magic: An Inside Look at the 2016 Aperture Summer Open

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Featured_SummerOpen

Participating artists discuss the illusory nature of photography, and the impact it’s had on their work.

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Arbus Before Arbus

Diane Arbus, Taxicab driver at the wheel with two passengers, N.Y.C., 1956 © The Estate of Diane Arbus, LLC.
Diane Arbus, Taxicab driver at the wheel with two passengers, N.Y.C., 1956 © The Estate of Diane Arbus, LLC.

A new exhibition at the Met Breuer, featuring previously unseen prints, reveals the early impulses of a modern master.

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Doug DuBois on Chris Killip In Flagrante Two

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PBR010_079

My first encounter with In Flagrante (1988) was in San Francisco, where the year it was released I made regular visits to Lawrence Ferlinghetti’s City Lights bookstore, and to the used bookstores sandwiched between the strip clubs on Broadway. It worked like this: I would go to City Lights to touch and ogle the unaffordable photobooks, read a few pages of an ever-growing list of post-structuralist or feminist literary theory and postmodern art criticism, then head over to Broadway to scour the bins in hopes of finding something more affordable (one such find was a $14.95 copy of Larry Sultan…

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Vicki Goldberg on Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby Enduring Truths: Sojourner’s Shadows and Substance

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PBR010_022

In 1826 a thirty-year-old slave escapes captivity becoming a legally free, outspoken and effective supporter of the abolitionist cause.

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Eugénie Shinkle on Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin Spirit is a Bone

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PBR010_121

The images in Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chagrin’s Spirit is a Bone were made using advanced facial recognition software, which gathers data from four separate lenses and builds a model of the face according to the configuration of the skull—the spaces, unique to each face, between eyes, nose, and mouth. The resulting three-dimensional images, all depicting citizens of Moscow, are data visualizations rather than photographic portraits per se. Usually taken without the subject’s knowledge, they are euphemistically termed “non-collaborative” by the Russian engineers who designed the software used to create them. The book takes its title from Hegel’s claim, in…

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Revisiting the Berlin Wall

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2016_07_26_BerlinFeatured

In the 1960s, East German border troops photographed the entire length of the Berlin Wall. Fifty years later, a new book brings a secret archive to light.

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Andrew Stefan Weiner on Marcel Broodthaers Musée d ’Art Moderne, Département des Aigles, Section Publicité

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Broodthaers_3

The Belgian artist Marcel Broodthaers has long suffered from a bifurcated reception: while his work has been shunned by many, due in part to his reputation as a hermitic figure or a stylistic outlier, it has been championed by others, who see it as a pivotal threshold in the development of critical post-conceptual art. Mindful of this divide, a major international 2016 retrospective currently on view at New York’s Museum of Modern Art has sought to complicate viewers’ sense of Broodthaers’s oeuvre. The present moment seems like an apt time to reevaluate the 1995 publication Musée d’Art Moderne, Département des…

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Memories of the African Diaspora: A Conversation with Nicola Lo Calzo

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REGLA_LOCALZO_Featured

Exploring the rituals and communities of African descendants in Cuba, a photographer reveals their solidarity and resistance to oppression.

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