In the late 1970s, the George Eastman Museum asked a group of photographers for their favorite recipes and food-related photographs to go with them, in pursuit of publishing a cookbook. Playing off George Eastman’s famous recipe for lemon meringue pie and former director Beaumont Newhall’s love of food, the cookbook grew from the idea that talent in the darkroom must also translate to the kitchen. Published now, nearly forty years later, The Photographer’s Cookbook is a time capsule of the 1970s, and includes recipes and photographs from Robert Adams, Richard Avedon, Imogen Cunningham, William Eggleston, among others. In this spirit, Aperture commissioned contemporary photographers to submit a recipe and food-related picture. The resulting works reveal a fascinating look at how today’s photographers depict food, home, and ritual, raising questions about consumption, desire, pleasure, and, in the broadest sense, taste itself.


Daniel Gordon (b. 1980 Boston, MA; raised in San Francisco, California, USA) earned a Bachelor of Arts from Bard College in 2004, and a Master of Fine Arts from the Yale School of Art in 2006. His notable group exhibitions include New Photography 2009 at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and Greater New York 2010 at MoMA PS1. He is the Author of Still Lifes, Portraits, and Parts (Mörel, 2013), Flowers and Shadows (Onestar Press, 2011) and Flying Pictures (powerHouse Books, 2009). He is the winner of the 2014 Foam Paul Huf award, and exhibited his work in a solo exhibition at the museum in 2014. Gordon is represented by James Fuentes in New York City and is the co-director of Downstairs Projects. He lives and works in Brooklyn.

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