prints

prints

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  1. Sochi Project Box Set: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus

    Sochi Project Box Set: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus

    $575.00

    Out of stock

    This Special Edition of 'An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus' consists of a signed copy of the book and a protective folder with two signed and numbered C-prints in a handmade red linen slipcase. Hamzad Ivloev, Nazran, Ingushetia, 2012: Hamzad Ivloev, 44, was a policeman in Karabulak. One night he discovered a booby trap. At that moment reinforcements arrived. Hamzad started screaming and telling them to run away. But no one responded. He decided to throw himself on the grenade. "In retrospect, it was all for nothing. I sacrificed myself for a bunch of cowards", he says bitterly. Elena, Sochi, Russia, 2012: Elena, thirty-one, has been a dancer at Art Klub, the strip club on the first floor of the monstrous Hotel Zhemchuzhina, for eighteen months. Loud music, sweaty bodies on the pebble beach, and striptease are perhaps more at home in Sochi than the sporting spectacles of the Winter Olympics. The coming years will prove what survives of both. Learn More
  2. Ewokom Masquerade, Eshinjok Village, Nigeria, 2004

    Ewokom Masquerade, Eshinjok Village, Nigeria, 2004

    $850.00

    Aperture is pleased to release a special limited-edition photograph by Phyllis Galembo on the occasion of the reissue of her book Maske by Aperture. 

For over two decades, Galembo has documented cultural and religious traditions in Africa and among the African Diaspora. Traveling widely throughout western and central Africa, and regularly to Haiti, Galembo photographs participants in masquerade events—traditional African ceremonies and contemporary costume parties and carnivals—who use costume, body paint, and masks to create mythic characters. Learn More
  3. The Red Balloon

    The Red Balloon

    $3,500.00

    In anticipation of the upcoming publication Short Stories: Photographs by Paolo Ventura, Aperture is pleased to release two new limited-editions in support of this publication and crafted by the artist in his studio in Italy. Each suite of pictures is presented in a specially design box produced by the artist. Paolo Ventura’s Short Stories are whimsical narratives told through pictures—tales of love, war, and family—where things magically appear or disappear, set in an imaginary past of World War II Italy. Much like in silent films, the drama unfolds with no words
or captions. For these works and those to be featured in the publication , Ventura constructed life-sized sets, in which he situated himself and members of his family (casting his son, wife and twin brother as actors), in stories that are at once charming and disquieting. While seemingly simple, Ventura’s vignettes come with larger implications: brothers who encounter each other by surprise on the battlefield, jugglers who appear from above, a man who packs himself into his suitcase, a small-town magician who accidently makes his son disappear for real, and many others. Here, Ventura has built a world of realistic proportions and actors, in fantastical tales and against painted backdrops—challenging notions of what is real and what is make-believe. Featured here are special print editions of two of these tales, Man with Suitcase #2 and The Red Ballon. Each will be featured in the book, which collects the entire series of Ventura’s Short Stories together for the first time, including three previously unpublished, and offers a glimpse into the artist’s extraordinary imagination. Learn More
  4. The Man in the Suitcase #2

    The Man in the Suitcase #2

    $3,000.00

    In anticipation of the upcoming publication Short Stories: Photographs by Paolo Ventura, Aperture is pleased to release two new limited-editions in support of this publication and crafted by the artist in his studio in Italy. Each suite of pictures is presented in a specially design box produced by the artist. Paolo Ventura’s Short Stories are whimsical narratives told through pictures—tales of love, war, and family—where things magically appear or disappear, set in an imaginary past of World War II Italy. Much like in silent films, the drama unfolds with no words
or captions. For these works and those to be featured in the publication, Ventura constructed life-sized sets, in which he situated himself and members of his family (casting his son, wife and twin brother as actors), in stories that are at once charming and disquieting. While seemingly simple, Ventura’s vignettes come with larger implications: brothers who encounter each other by surprise on the battlefield, jugglers who appear from above, a man who packs himself into his suitcase, a small-town magician who accidently makes his son disappear for real, and many others. Here, Ventura has built a world of realistic proportions and actors, in fantastical tales and against painted backdrops—challenging notions of what is real and what is make-believe. Featured here are special print editions of two of these tales, Man with Suitcase #2 and The Red Ballon. Each will be featured in the book, which collects the entire series of Ventura’s Short Stories together for the first time, including three previously unpublished, and offers a glimpse into the artist’s extraordinary imagination. Learn More
  5. Jordan up the Pole, Russell Heights, Cobh, Ireland, 2010

    Jordan up the Pole, Russell Heights, Cobh, Ireland, 2010

    $850.00

    Jordan up the Pole, Russell Heights, Cobh, Ireland, 2010 by Doug Dubois Learn More
  6. Photography Is Magic Commission: Picture 088 (Pomegranate, Bird Feathers Collection, Toast, Strawberry 2.0...)

    Photography Is Magic Commission: Picture 088 (Pomegranate, Bird Feathers Collection, Toast, Strawberry 2.0...)

    $3,500.00

    Asha Schechter’s artistic practice is set within the context of a networked, commodity-centric culture—where a wholesale movement away from privileging the “source” or “original” is coded into every creative photographic gesture. In his brilliantly disorienting works, photographic motifs and 3-D renderings appear to hover and scatter across the picture plane, indicative of Schechter’s questioning of our contemporary image world from a position consciously within its default dynamics and aesthetics. "I am interested in the lifespan of images. I am interested in how an image comes into being, what kind of work it does, how it ages, and when it stops being useful. I think of certain kinds of 3-D models as underemployed—the kinds of models that on first blush make sense, but after further scrutiny look off in one way or another. These images have made their way into the pictures, stickers, and videos I have been making—sometimes being put to sensible use, and sometimes floating in an indeterminate space, hoping that someday they might have something better to do." —AS Learn More
  7. Photography Is Magic Commission: Composition 521/073a, 2015
  8. Photography Is Magic Commission: Thimblerig, 2015

    Photography Is Magic Commission: Thimblerig, 2015

    $5,000.00

    Lucas Blalock’s Thimblerig uses software as its material, declaring “painterly” operations to be capable of distinctly authored aesthetics. Such an approach brings the material possibilities of software into focus, essentially calling out Photoshop as a medium in its own right, with inherent possibilities for creative subjectivity and for defining the character of contemporary picture-making. "When I started making the work shown here, in 2006, I was channeling a then-newfound interest in the nineteenth century— photography’s role in it, and figures from Courbet to P. T. Barnum. The Metropolitan Museum of Art had just done a survey of Spiritualist photography titled The Perfect Medium, which had an important impact on me. The conjuring of the trope of confidence—and its alternate, humbug—was a beginning for me, and a mirror for “the digital.” As my work took shape, it ended up being a performance of magic; its staging, its relationship to spectacle and commodity, became central. I came to think about the studio as a theater space and discovered in the ideas of Bertolt Brecht a way to put pressure on this and to picture it. I started to consider how much labor was hidden in the making of a photograph, and began making the evidence of these things part of my picture-making. In the way I was working, this was not only with the physical/optical apparatus of the studio, but also the computer’s tools. In the past few years, with increasing intensity, I have come full circle to thinking about picture-making as a way around the narrow, spectacular magic of the commodity, and as having a much deeper relationship to genuine possibility." Learn More
  9. Photography Is Magic Commission: Half, 2015

    Photography Is Magic Commission: Half, 2015

    $12,000.00

    Sara VanDerBeek’s Half is a new work created exclusively for this Aperture commission, representing her current explorations of the material and imaginative properties of the photographic form. VanDerBeek aligns Half to one of the central tenets of Photography Is Magic: that photographs can act as prompts for the creation of magic in the viewer’s imagination, by confusing and misdirecting his or her attention. This work is intentionally created to act as a constant illusion that confounds us by beautifully conflating the physical and imaginary affects of a photograph into a single image. "I am constantly striving for my images to rest somewhere between the actual and the imagined. Many of the formal decisions I make during their capture, and their eventual conclusion through digital and chromogenic printing processes, are attempts to reach a dynamic balance of observation and abstraction. My hope is that the images give the sense that they are of something that can be recognized as belonging to the real world, but also perhaps to the world of dreams, of memory, and of the imagination." —SV Learn More
  10. Photography Is Magic Commission: Solar Panel/Barn/Paper

    Photography Is Magic Commission: Solar Panel/Barn/Paper

    $3,500.00

    Hannah Whitaker’s Solar Panel/Barn/Paper speaks to the crucial act of misdirection in close-up magic tricks: the capacity of a magician to move our attention away from the sleight of hand taking place in front of us. The forms in Whitaker’s photograph seem to present themselves as being literally arranged on the paper but, simultaneously, offer abundant clues about the falsity of this initial assumption, found especially in the discernable photographic subjects that Whitaker combines. The physical photograph is formally definite, while the juxtapositions of real-world subjects are magically illogical. "My works are shot on 4-by-5 film through hand-cut paper screens. I use film in order to limit the field of possibilities. You can think of film as allowing for an infinite set of possibilities, and of digital processes as allowing for even more infinite possibilities. I find limitations to be generative, so I prefer the smaller field." —HW Learn More

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