From Our Blog

The Other Side of Gordon Parks

January 12th, 2018

A new exhibition reconsiders the legendary photographer’s fashion and portrait work.

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Events Calendar

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  • Jan 31

    Member Tour, Peter Hujar: Speed of Life

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    INVITE ONLY

    Aperture Members at the Friend ($250) level and above are invited to The Morgan Library & Museum for a private tour of the current exhibition, Peter Hujar: Speed of Life. The Morgan’s Richard L. Menschel Curator of Photography, Joel Smith, will introduce the exhibition and work by Hujar.

    Not an Aperture Member? Become one today to receive an invitation to this Member event and participate in other educational gatherings year round!

    Peter Hujar: Speed of Life—on view at the Morgan through May 20—presents 140 photographs by this enormously important and influential artist. Drawn from the extensive holdings of his work at the Morgan and from nine other collections, the show and its catalogue follow Peter Hujar (1934–1987) from his artistic beginnings in the mid-1950s to his central role in the East Village art scene three decades later.

    Hujar inhabited a world of avant-garde dance, music, art, and drag performance. His mature career paralleled the public unfolding of gay life between the Stonewall uprising in 1969 and the AIDS crisis of the 1980s.

    Published alongside this major touring exhibition, Aperture’s Peter Hujar: Speed of Life presents Hujar’s famous portraiture as well as his lesser-known projects and includes texts by Joel Smith, Philip Gefter, Steve Turtell, and Martha Scott Burton.

    Photo Credit: Peter Hujar, David Wojnarowicz Reclining (2), 1981; from Peter Hujar: Speed of Life (Aperture, 2017) © The Peter Hujar Archive, LLC. Courtesy Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York, and Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

  • Feb 7

    Member Preview of Prison Nation Exhibition

    Aperture Gallery and Bookstore

    547 West 27th Street

    New York,NY

    INVITE ONLY

    Not an Aperture Member? Join Aperture’s membership program to get closer to the best in photography.

    Aperture requests the pleasure of your company at an exhibition preview reception on Wednesday, February 7, from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m., for Prison Nation. A public panel discussion, Narratives from Inside, featuring Nigel Poor, Virginia Grise, and Virgilio Bravo will take place immediately following the preview.

    6:00 p.m.– Introduction by Aperture magazine editor Michael Famighetti and contributing editor Nicole R. Fleetwood

    7:00–8:30 p.m.– Public panel discussion, Narratives from Inside, featuring Nigel Poor, Virginia Grise, and Virgilio Bravo. Moderated by Shani Jamila

    Most prisons and jails across the United States do not allow prisoners to have access to cameras. At a moment when 2.2 million people are incarcerated in the US, 3.8 million people are on probation, and 870,000 former prisoners are on parole, how can images tell the story of mass incarceration when the imprisoned don’t have control over their own representation? How can photographs visualize a reality that disproportionately affects people of color, and, for many, remains outside of view?

    This exhibition coincides with the publication of “Prison Nation,” Aperture magazine’s spring issue organized with the scholar Nicole R. Fleetwood, an expert on art’s relation to incarceration. Addressing the unique role photography plays in creating a visual record of a national crisis, this exhibition and issue are accompanied by a series of six public programs—featuring speakers such as Nigel Poor, Aliya Hana Hussain, Keith Calhoun, Chandra McCormich, Jamel Shabazz, Deborah Luster, Bruce Jackson, Shani Jamila, Jesse Krimes, Sable Elyse Smith, Joseph Rodriguez, and more—all to take place at Aperture Foundation’s gallery.

    Aperture  magazine’s “Prison Nation” issue and the related exhibition and programs are funded, in part, with generous lead support from the Ford Foundation, as well as funding from the Reba Judith Sandler Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the Grace Jones Richardson Trust, and the Board of Trustees and Members of Aperture Foundation. Additional public funds are from the National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

     

     

     

     

     

    Image: Sable Elyse Smith, from Landscapes & Playgrounds (Sming Sming Books, 2017)

  • Feb 7

    Narratives From Inside

    Aperture Gallery and Bookstore

    547 West 27th Street

    New York,NY

    Panelists: Nigel Poor, Virginia Grise, Vee Bravo

    How can storytelling convey the experience of incarceration? Be it photographs, podcasts, or fiction workshops, these panelists deploy various modes of narrative strategy to bring stories of incarceration beyond prison walls.

    Moderated by Shani Jamila, managing director of the Urban Justice Center.

    Join us for the first in a series of public programs that accompany the spring issue of Aperture magazine and the related exhibition, Prison Nation, photographers, writers, historians, and activists discuss the unique role photography, art, and storytelling play in understanding and creating a dialogue around the crisis of mass incarceration in the United States. Following this panel, there will be a short reception to celebrate the opening of this exhibition.

    Click here to see the full list of Prison Nation programming

    Shani Jamila
    is a visual artist and cultural organizer. Her travels to nearly fifty countries deeply inform her photography, collage, and performance practice. She has exhibited, lectured, and performed at institutions including Harvard University, the Reginald F. Lewis Museum, Smack Mellon Gallery, SCOPE Art Fair, Corridor Gallery, City College of New York, the New Museum, the Phillips Collection, NYU, Princeton University, and the Brooklyn Museum. Named “One of the 35 Most Remarkable Women in the World” by Essence magazine, she has an image and quote featured in A Choice to Change the World, a permanent exhibition at her alma mater, Spelman College.

    Nigel Poor’s work has been shown at the San Jose Museum of Art and Institute of Contemporary Art, San Jose, California; Friends of Photography, SF Camerawork, Haines Gallery, and SFMOMA, San Francisco; Museum of Contemporary Art and Museum of Photographic Arts, San Diego; and Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. Her work is in the collections of SFMOMA, the de Young Museum, San Diego Museum of Contemporary Art, and Corcoran Gallery of Art. She is a professor at CSU Sacramento and the cocreator and cohost of the prison-based podcast Ear Hustle.

    Virginia Grise is a recipient of the Whiting writers’ award, the Princess Grace Award in theater directing, and the Yale Drama Series award. Her published work includes Your Healing Is Killing Me (Plays Inverse Press), blu (Yale University Press), The Panza Monologues (cowritten with Irma Mayorga; University of Texas Press), and an edited volume of Zapatista communiqués titled Conversations with Don Durito (Autonomedia Press). She earned her MFA from the California Institute of the Arts and currently lives and writes in the Bronx.

    Vee Bravo is a New York native by way of Chile who has documented and written about hip-hop culture for the past twenty-three years. During that timespan he cofounded Stress Magazine, the first national publication to fuse hip-hop and politics. As a filmmaker Bravo coproduced the PBS documentary Estilo Hip Hop (2009), which chronicles the rise of hip-hop activism across Latin America. Since 2000 Bravo has also been instrumental in the integration of music and film education programs into the New York State prison system. As Vice President, Education at Tribeca Film Institute, Bravo has launched and directly taught several film-screening and scriptwriting programs for young people and adults across Rikers Island, Otisville, and Shawangunk correctional facilities.

    Image: Nigel Poor, Prison Rock Band, June 26, 1975; Courtesy the artist and Haines Gallery, San Francisco

    Aperture magazine’s “Prison Nation” issue and the related exhibition and programs are funded, in part, with generous lead support from the Ford Foundation, as well as funding from the Reba Judith Sandler Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the Grace Jones Richardson Trust, and the Board of Trustees and Members of Aperture Foundation. Additional public funds are from the National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

  • Feb 8

    Aperture Connect Member Meet-Up

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    MEMBER EVENT

    INVITE ONLY

    Aperture Connect Members are invited to the Long Island City studio of artist Sarah Meyohas for refreshments and a discussion led by the artist.

    Sarah Meyohas (French-American, born 1991) holds a BA in international relations from the University of Pennsylvania and a BS in finance from the Wharton School. In 2015 she received an MFA from Yale University. She has been the subject of solo exhibitions at Galerie Pact, Paris; Independents Régence, Brussels; 303 Gallery, New York; and Where, Brooklyn. She has participated in group shows at Aperture Foundation, New York; Regen Projects, Los Angeles; Alice Gallery, Seattle; and Stux Gallery, New York. Her work has been featured in the New York Times magazine, Time magazine, Wired, Vice, Fortune, Artspace, and the Atlantic. Meyohas lives, works, and owns an eponymously named gallery in New York City.

    Aperture Connect is a dynamic group of supporters (ages 21 to 37), residing in the New York Tri-State area, who seek to further their knowledge and understanding of photography, publishing, and the international photo community.

    Not an Aperture Connect Member? Become one today to receive an exclusive invitation to this event and participate in other educational gatherings year round!

    Image: Sarah Meyohas, Rope Speculation, 2017

     

     

  • Feb 14

    Seeing Angola

    Aperture Gallery and Bookstore

    547 West 27th Street

    New York,NY

    Panelists: Deborah Luster, Zachary Lazar, Keith Calhoun and Chandra McCormick

    Louisiana’s State Penitentiary, the largest maximum-security prison in the United States, is also known as “Angola,” as it sits on the site of a former plantation with a slave population originating from Angola, Africa. This panel convenes three photographers and one writer who have made work about the notorious prison in a state that has the highest rate of incarceration of any place in the world.

    Moderated by Makeda Best, Richard L. Menschel Curator of Photography at the Harvard Art Museums.

    In a series of public programs that accompany the spring issue of Aperture magazine and the related exhibition, Prison Nation, photographers, writers, historians, and activists discuss the unique role photography, art, and storytelling play in understanding and creating a dialogue around the crisis of mass incarceration in the United States.

    Click here to see the full list of Prison Nation programming

    Makeda Best is the Richard L. Menschel Curator of Photography at the Harvard Art Museums. She joined the Museums in 2017. She is currently at work on the upcoming exhibition James Baldwin’s America. Forthcoming publications include a book on Civil War–era photography, an essay on photography and incarceration, and an article on class and labor in nineteenth-century American photography. She is the coeditor of Conflict, Identity, and Protest in American Art (2016). She received her MFA in studio photography from the California Institute of the Arts and PhD from Harvard University.

    Deborah Luster is best known for her long-term documentary series One Big Self: Prisoners of Louisiana (with poet C. D. Wright; 1998–2003), a photographic archive of prisoner portraits from three Louisiana prisons, including the state penitentiary at Angola, and Tooth for an Eye: A Chorography of Violence in Orleans Parish (2008–11), an archive of cityscapes documenting locations in New Orleans where homicides have been committed. Both monographs were published by Twin Palms Publishing (in 2003 and 2011). Luster’s awards include a 2018 Ford Foundation Art of Change fellowship, a 2016 Robert Gardner Fellowship from the Peabody Museum, and a 2013 Guggenheim Fellowship.

    Image: Deborah Luster, Layla “Roach” Roberts (Inquisitor), 2012-13; Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

    Aperture magazine’s “Prison Nation” issue and the related exhibition and programs are funded, in part, with generous lead support from the Ford Foundation, as well as funding from the Reba Judith Sandler Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the Grace Jones Richardson Trust, and the Board of Trustees and Members of Aperture Foundation. Additional public funds are from the National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

  • Feb 21

    Inside Rikers Island

    Aperture Gallery and Bookstore

    547 West 27th Street

    New York,NY

    Panelists include: Jamel Shabazz, Lorenzo Steele Jr., Katherine Cheairs

    A movement to close New York’s Rikers Island jail facility is gaining momentum. This panel brings together two former corrections officers/photographers who worked at the facility in the 1980s and ’90s, as well as a documentary filmmaker who taught filmmaking to incarcerated women at Rikers, to discuss their work around the facility and criminal justice reform.

    Moderated by Brandon J. Holmes, NYC Campaign Coordinator at JustLeadershipUSA.

    In a series of public programs that accompany the spring issue of Aperture magazine and the related exhibition, Prison Nation, photographers, writers, historians, and activists discuss the unique role photography, art, and storytelling play in understanding and creating a dialogue around the crisis of mass incarceration in the United States.

    Click here to see the full list of Prison Nation programs

    Brandon J. Holmes is the New York City Campaign Coordinator at JustLeadershipUSA, where he leads the #CLOSErikers campaign. He oversees city-based advocacy campaigns and organizes day-to-day work in engaging members, fostering partner relationships, and developing campaign strategy. He is invested in the growth and sustainability of community activists and leaders, and committed to centering the voices of directly impacted communities through legislative advocacy and direct actions. Holmes’s grassroots campaigning experience includes organizing returning citizens and criminal justice–involved youth.

    Jamel Shabazz is best known for his iconic photographs of New York City during the 1980s. He is a documentary, fashion, and street photographer, and has authored eight monographs. His work has been exhibited in Italy, France, Korea, Turkey, Germany, Ethiopia, Brazil, and Japan and throughout the United States. Shabazz’s work is housed within the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, and the Bronx Museum of the Arts. Shabazz is a twenty-year veteran of the New York City Department of Correction.

    Lorenzo Steele Jr. is a criminal justice major, an accomplished visual artist, and a former corrections officer. While an officer (1987–99), he photographed some of the most disturbing and horrid images ever taken behind prison bars. After leaving the department after twelve years, Steele decided to share his personal experience and knowledge about the prison system in an attempt to deter youth from violence and incarceration. He created a book called Behind These Prison Walls: Life inside Rikers Island, in which he uses prison art to change habits and behaviors that can lead to criminal activity. His passion and commitment for children and the arts have allowed his stories and work to be displayed in art galleries, colleges, and public schools across America.

    Katherine “Kat” Cheairs is a documentary filmmaker, educator, and community artist from Atlanta who currently resides in Brooklyn. Cheairs works with a number of communities—including adult education, youth and after-school programs, and incarcerated youth and adults—to learn filmmaking practices. Her philosophy is that filmmaking can be used to archive the voices of those not often heard from, and create an opportunity for individual and collective healing. Cheairs has a BA in political science from Tufts University and an MFA in film and television from Chapman University.

    Image: Jamel Shabazz, A detainee from Brooklyn poses in the corridor of his housing area, Rikers Island, 1986; Courtesy the artist

    Aperture magazine’s “Prison Nation” issue and the related exhibition and programs are funded, in part, with generous lead support from the Ford Foundation, as well as funding from the Reba Judith Sandler Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the Grace Jones Richardson Trust, and the Board of Trustees and Members of Aperture Foundation. Additional public funds are from the National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

  • Feb 22 - Feb 25

    PHOTOFAIRS San Francisco

    Fort Mason’s Festival Pavilion

    2 Marina Blvd

    San Francisco,CA

    Aperture fan’s can enjoy a special 2-for-1 ticket offer: Visit https://www.photofairs.org/san-francisco/visitor/tickets and enter promotional code APERTURE2FOR1.

    First Look – Thursday, February 22: 5:00–10:00 p.m.
    Friday, February 23: 1:00–8:00 p.m.
    Saturday, February 24: 11:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.
    Saturday, February 24: 11:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

    Visit Aperture at PHOTOFAIRS | San Francisco—the cutting edge contemporary art fair dedicated to the photographic medium—returning to Fort Mason’s Festival Pavilion from February 22-25, 2018. The fair’s international focus and boutique curation create an excellent environment to discover and collect innovative works of art, while also offering an array of insightful public programs.

    For information, visit www.photofairs.org.

  • Feb 28

    Art & Incarceration

    Aperture Gallery and Bookstore

    547 West 27th Street

    New York,NY

    Panelists: Lisette Oblitas-Cruz, Aliya Hana Hussain, Jesse Krimes, Joseph Rodríguez

    How does incarceration impact art making for incarcerated artists and non-incarcerated artists concerned with the criminal justice system? This panel brings together a range of artists and figures who facilitate art projects with incarcerated individuals.

    Moderated by Nicole R. Fleetwood, contributing guest editor of Aperture’s “Prison Nation” magazine.

    In a series of public programs that accompany the spring issue of Aperture magazine and the related exhibition, Prison Nation, photographers, writers, historians, and activists discuss the unique role photography, art, and storytelling play in understanding and creating a dialogue around the crisis of mass incarceration in the United States.

    Click here to see the full list of Prison Nation programming

    Nicole R. Fleetwood is associate professor in the Department of American Studies at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. She is currently completing a book on art and mass incarceration. Her two previous books are Troubling Vision: Performance, Visuality, and Blackness (2011) and On Racial Icons: Blackness and the Public Imagination (2015). Fleetwood is the recipient of awards and fellowships from NYPL’s Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers, American Council of Learned Societies, Whiting Foundation, Schomburg Center for Scholars-in-Residence, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and National Endowment for the Arts.

    Jesse Krimes
    is a conceptual artist who lives and works in Philadelphia. While serving a six-year prison sentence, he produced numerous bodies of work that have been exhibited at the Palais de Tokyo, Paris; the Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers University; and the Leonard Pearlstein Gallery of Drexel University, among other venues. After his release in 2014, he partnered with the Soze agency to cofound “Right of Return USA,” the first national fellowship dedicated to supporting formerly incarcerated artists. Krimes is currently a 2017 Robert Rauschenberg fellow and is represented by Burning in Water gallery in New York.

    Joseph Rodríguez
    is a documentary photographer born and raised in Brooklyn. He studied photography in the School of Visual Arts and in the Photojournalism and Documentary Photography Program at the International Center of Photography in New York City. He has worked at print and online news organizations, including National Geographic, the New York Times Magazine, and the BBC. Rodríguez has been awarded Pictures of the Year by the National Press Photographers Association and the University of Missouri, in 1990, 1992, 1996, and 2002. He is the author of five books, and his photographs have been exhibited worldwide. He is represented by Galerie Bene Taschen.

    Image: Joseph Rodríguez, At Walden House FOTEP (Female Offender Treatment Employment Program), a young mother holds her son, El Monte, California, 2008; © the artist

    Aperture magazine’s “Prison Nation” issue and the related exhibition and programs are funded, in part, with generous lead support from the Ford Foundation, as well as funding from the Reba Judith Sandler Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the Grace Jones Richardson Trust, and the Board of Trustees and Members of Aperture Foundation. Additional public funds are from the National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

  • Mar 7

    Architecture of Confinement

    Aperture Gallery and Bookstore

    547 West 27th Street

    New York,NY

    Panelists: Bruce Jackson, Stephen Tourlentes, and other speakers to be announced

    This panel considers incarceration from an architectural perspective and how photographers engage with prisons as omnipresent structures in the American landscape. Moderated by educator and activist, Shana Agid.

    In a series of public programs that accompany the spring issue of Aperture magazine and the related exhibition, Prison Nation, photographers, writers, historians, and activists discuss the unique role photography, art, and storytelling play in understanding and creating a dialogue around the crisis of mass incarceration in the United States.

    Click here to see the full list of Prison Nation programming

    Image: Stephen Tourlentes, Wyoming State Death House Prison, Rawlins, Wyoming, 2000; Courtesy the artist and Carroll and Sons, Boston

    Aperture magazine’s “Prison Nation” issue and the related exhibition and programs are funded, in part, with generous lead support from the Ford Foundation, as well as funding from the Reba Judith Sandler Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the Grace Jones Richardson Trust, and the Board of Trustees and Members of Aperture Foundation. Additional public funds are from the National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.