the aperture blog: web-only reviews, interviews, essays, and foundation news

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featured

Announcing the 2020 Aperture Summer Open Artists

At a moment when ideas about truth have been disrupted, these artists consider how photography portrays our experiences of technology, politics, and the social landscape.

exhibition

A Dark and Lyrical Vision of Latin America

Santiago Escobar-Jaramillo’s photographs reflect the ambiguities of political violence in Colombia, Cuba, and Venezuela.

aperture magazine

On the Cover: Aperture’s “Ballads” Issue

How Goldin’s iconic slideshow and book became an enduring model for photographers across ages and around the world.

featured

12 Photographers on How to Survive the Lockdown

From Brooklyn to Bangladesh, what to read, watch, and listen to—and why to keep going.

featured

Is the Still Life the Form of the Moment?

Six photography curators consider images that have new resonance in the era of social distancing.

featured

Los Angeles without Angelenos

Taken during shelter-in-place orders, Pascal Shirley’s aerial pictures of LA are full of poetic foreboding.

reviews

Dress for What Job?

As millions file for unemployment, a large-scale exhibition explores the meanings of workwear.

introducing

Introducing: Natalie Keyssar

In Venezuela, a photographer finds spontaneous grief and joy in everyday life.

from the archive

How Should a Mother Be?

Charlie Engman’s portraits of his mother are an intimate—and provocative—exchange of mind, body, and spirit.

featured

5 Depression-Era Photographs That Galvanized Social Change

From Dorothea Lange to Walker Evans, the FSA photographers of the 1930s shaped a vision of the world transformed by economic crisis.

talks & interviews

In a World of Loneliness, One Photographer’s Search for Community

Eli Durst speaks about team-building exercises, suburban Americana, and why his photographs resist interpretation.

essays

What Is Street Photography without Street Life?

In the age of pandemic, the romance of the empty street becomes the terror of absence.

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