Peter Kayafas on Terry Tempest Williams, The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks

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  America is defined as much by its open spaces—where the hand of man is invisible or only circumstantially present—as it is by convenient mythologies, historical triumphs, or architectural marvels or atrocities. This year, the hundredth anniversary of America’s National Park Service is marked by numerous publications and a variety of celebrations of the public places under its stewardship. For those of us lucky enough to have had the time and facility to explore the parks, we can acknowledge that such adventures have caused unexpected changes in how we see, and in how we see ourselves. The Hour of Land…

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The Accidental PhotoBook

Denise Wolff   We are at a moment when the community of photobook makers and collectors is expanding rapidly, yet also becoming more insular. We’re ever searching for that handmade artist book created just for the art fair, available in limited copies that are going fast. For many years, the Martin Parr/Gerry Badger Photobook: A History and other books about books have served as a shopping list, bestowing value on the included volumes. Looking back through The Photobook: A History, however, it’s worth remembering that they cast a wide net, including among the shimmer of possibilitys and Sleeping by the…

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Announcing the Winners of the 2016 PhotoBook Awards

We’re pleased to announce the winners of the 2016 edition of the Paris Photo–Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards.

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The 2016 PhotoBook Awards Shortlist

Aperture and Paris Photo announce the shortlist for the 2016 PhotoBook Awards.

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Justine Kurland on Mariken Wessels Taking Off. Henry My Neighbor

A photographer’s obsessive relationship with his wife, and the powerful yet peculiar work that resulted.

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Publisher’s Profile: Ruben Lundgren in conversation with Yuan Di, Jiazazhi Press

Ruben Lundgren speaks with Yuan Di about his independent Chinese publishing house, Jiazazhi Press

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Doug DuBois on Chris Killip In Flagrante Two

My first encounter with In Flagrante (1988) was in San Francisco, where the year it was released I made regular visits to Lawrence Ferlinghetti’s City Lights bookstore, and to the used bookstores sandwiched between the strip clubs on Broadway. It worked like this: I would go to City Lights to touch and ogle the unaffordable photobooks, read a few pages of an ever-growing list of post-structuralist or feminist literary theory and postmodern art criticism, then head over to Broadway to scour the bins in hopes of finding something more affordable (one such find was a $14.95 copy of Larry Sultan…

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Vicki Goldberg on Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby, Enduring Truths: Sojourner’s Shadows and Substance

In 1826 a thirty-year-old slave escapes captivity becoming a legally free, outspoken and effective supporter of the abolitionist cause.

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Eugénie Shinkle on Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin Spirit is a Bone

The images in Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin’s Spirit is a Bone were made using advanced facial recognition software, which gathers data from four separate lenses and builds a model of the face according to the configuration of the skull—the spaces, unique to each face, between eyes, nose, and mouth. The resulting three-dimensional images, all depicting citizens of Moscow, are data visualizations rather than photographic portraits per se. Usually taken without the subject’s knowledge, they are euphemistically termed “non-collaborative” by the Russian engineers who designed the software used to create them. The book takes its title from Hegel’s claim, in…

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