Robert Adams on Gregory Halpern, ZZYZX

D. H. Lawrence admired the American Southwest but found Southern California troubling: “In a way, it has turned its back on the world, and looks into the void Pacific. It is absolutely selfish, very empty, but not false.” Gregory Halpern records an aspect of what still seems to be its emptiness—a careless isolation from one another. The idea of community appears to be almost beyond our imagination. Halpern’s Southern California is, however, in another sense, far from empty. Despite our neglect of what we might improve—others’ lives, and the places we share—there is frequently evident an unorthodox beauty. No matter…

Guilty Pleasures/Hidden Treasures: Darius Himes and Frish Brandt

              Darius Himes on Robert Spector The Pizza Hut Story Melcher Media and IPHFHA New York and Wichita, KS, 2008 The official geographic center of the continental United States of America is in Lebanon, Kansas, a mere 199 miles from Wichita, the birthplace of Pizza Hut. It somehow seems fitting that a chain restaurant with such national (and global) reach emanated from smack-dab in the center of the country. In 1958, the Carney brothers borrowed $600 from their mother to open a restaurant after seeing an article in the Saturday Evening Post about a…

Frédérique Destribats on Children’s PhotoBooks

  As photography developed in the wake of its invention in 1839, constant improvement in processing and printing techniques, quality and production, accelerated the distribution of the photobook and contributed to its success. Naturally feeding on this history, photographically illustrated books for children were introduced by the end of the nineteenth century. Their expansion was encouraged by such events as the gradual introduction of laws implementing compulsory schooling, which led to a rising demand for illustrated books from the growing numbers of young readers and educational institutions. The first photographically illustrated books for children came in the form of photo…

Video Response: Amos Mulder on Inka and Niclas Lindergård, The Belt of Venus and the Shadow of the Earth

Amos Mulder is a video artist whose works include visual responses to found footage, texts, and photographic images; he describes his series as “video haikus,” adding that “I love to explore these parallel universes and catch their atmospheres and governing principles in short films. While rooted in the history of cinema, these films are also inspired by (and combined with) other nice things such as music, photography, and philosophy.” For this issue, he accepted guest editor Daria Tuminas’s assignment to create a video response to Inka and Niclas Lindergård’s The Belt of Venus and the Shadow of the Earth. The…

Publisher Profile

TBW Books Matthew Leifheit in conversation with Paul Schiek So often in art—as in life—the decision to prioritize someone else’s dreams, even temporarily, is looked at as if it means one’s own artistic vision and conviction may be wavering. Paul Schiek, a photographer and independent publisher based in Oakland, California, has been curating, writing, and publishing under his imprint TBW Books, in addition to making his own photographs, for the past ten years. He seems to see this varied outpouring as a medium in its own right. His generous vision is perhaps most evident in TBW’s Subscription Series, an annual…

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The PhotoBook Review is a publication dedicated to the consideration of the photobook—focusing on the best photography books being published, from the coffee-table book to the handmade artist’s edition, and on creating a better understanding of the ecosystem of the photobook as a whole.

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