Mariken Wessels, Taking Off. Henry My Neighbor, Art Paper Editions. Ghent, Belgium, 2015. Designed by Mariken Wessels and Jurgen Maelfeyt.

Justine Kurland on Mariken Wessels Taking Off. Henry My Neighbor

A photographer’s obsessive relationship with his wife, and the powerful yet peculiar work that resulted.

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Publisher’s Profile: Ruben Lundgren in conversation with Yuan Di, Jiazazhi Press

Ruben Lundgren speaks with Yuan Di about his independent Chinese publishing house, Jiazazhi Press

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Doug DuBois on Chris Killip In Flagrante Two

My first encounter with In Flagrante (1988) was in San Francisco, where the year it was released I made regular visits to Lawrence Ferlinghetti’s City Lights bookstore, and to the used bookstores sandwiched between the strip clubs on Broadway. It worked like this: I would go to City Lights to touch and ogle the unaffordable photobooks, read a few pages of an ever-growing list of post-structuralist or feminist literary theory and postmodern art criticism, then head over to Broadway to scour the bins in hopes of finding something more affordable (one such find was a $14.95 copy of Larry Sultan…

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Vicki Goldberg on Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby, Enduring Truths: Sojourner’s Shadows and Substance

In 1826 a thirty-year-old slave escapes captivity becoming a legally free, outspoken and effective supporter of the abolitionist cause.

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Eugénie Shinkle on Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin Spirit is a Bone

The images in Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin’s Spirit is a Bone were made using advanced facial recognition software, which gathers data from four separate lenses and builds a model of the face according to the configuration of the skull—the spaces, unique to each face, between eyes, nose, and mouth. The resulting three-dimensional images, all depicting citizens of Moscow, are data visualizations rather than photographic portraits per se. Usually taken without the subject’s knowledge, they are euphemistically termed “non-collaborative” by the Russian engineers who designed the software used to create them. The book takes its title from Hegel’s claim, in…

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The PhotoBook Review is a publication dedicated to the consideration of the photobook—focusing on the best photography books being published, from the coffee-table book to the handmade artist’s edition, and on creating a better understanding of the ecosystem of the photobook as a whole.

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