From Our Blog

Henri Cartier-Bresson, Astrologer's Shop, Bombay, Maharashtra, India, 1947 © the artist / Magnum Photos

Henri Cartier-Bresson’s Glimpse of India

May 25th, 2017
Henri Cartier-Bresson, Astrologer's Shop, Bombay, Maharashtra, India, 1947 © the artist / Magnum Photos

Spanning decades, an exhibition of the iconic photographer’s work in India reveals the fraught nature of photojournalism.

Current Issue

Events Calendar

< May >
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31 1 2 3 4
  • May 29

    Gallery and Bookstore Closed

    Aperture Gallery and Bookstore

    547 West 27th Street, 4th Floor

    New York,NY

  • Jun 1

    Fashion Night: Modern Black Dandies

    Brooklyn Museum

    200 Eastern Parkway

    Brooklyn,NY

    Join the Brooklyn Museum and Aperture Foundation for a night of fashion, film, and music in celebration of the art and style of black dandies, men of African descent who use fashion to define and inhabit a proud, radically independent public persona. The event is organized in honor of author Shantrelle P. Lewis’s new book, Dandy Lion: The Black Dandy and Street Style.

    For more information, visit www.eventbrite.com

    Shantrelle P. Lewis is a U.S.-based curator and researcher specializing in diasporic aesthetics, and the survival and evolution of African retentions. She was a 2014 United Nations Program for People of African Descent Fellow and a 2012–13 Andy Warhol Curatorial Fellow. Lewis has curated exhibitions for several institutions including the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts; Aljira, a Center for Contemporary Art; Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture; and the African American Museum in Philadelphia. Her traveling curatorial initiative, The Dandy Lion Project, examines global black dandyism through photography and film.

    BM_logo_black

    CBMA Logo Full Color

  • Jun 2

    Semiannual Benefactor Luncheon

    Aperture Gallery and Bookstore

    547 West 27th Street, 4th Floor

    New York,NY

    Members at the Benefactor Circle level ($2,500) or above are invited to join Aperture’s senior editor Denise Wolff for an afternoon of show-and-tell and discussion about the rich history of food in photographs from our forthcoming book, Feast for the Eyes: The Story of Food in Photography by Susan Bright.

    Photographers, through a range of expressions, have depicted this most common of subjects, and the resulting works from the hilarious to the devastating hold our lives and times up to the light, forming the building blocks of culture and reflecting how we see ourselves.

    Not a Benefactor Circle MemberJoin today to receive an invitation for you and a guest to attend our June 2nd luncheon and other events throughout the year. For further assistance, contact Hillary Beson at 212.946.7146 or hbeson@aperture.org.

    Denise Wolff is a senior editor at Aperture, specializing in photography books. Prior to Aperture, she was the commissioning editor for photography at Phaidon Press in London. Recent books she has commissioned include The Open Road: Photography and the American Road Trip; The Photographer’s Playbook: 307 Assignments and Ideas; the Photography Workshop Series books; and This Equals That, a children’s book by Jason Fulford and Tamara Shopsin.

    Image: Laura Letinsky, Untitled #54, 2002; from the series Hardly More Than Ever, Courtesy the artist and Yancey Richardson Gallery, NYC

  • Jun 3

    Aperture On Sight: Teaching Visual Literacy Through Photography

    Aperture Gallery and Bookstore

    547 West 27th Street, 4th Floor

    New York,NY

    Join Aperture for the opening reception of Aperture On Sight: Teaching Visual Literacy Through Photography.

    This exhibition features photographs and photobooks made by students of Aperture’s 2016/17 visual literacy program, Aperture On Sight. Over the course of twenty classes, these students strengthened their visual literacy skills by learning how to analyze and interpret images—a cognitive ability that is decidedly valuable in today’s wired world. Aperture’s curriculum expands students’ visual literacy by teaching them to look carefully, articulate ideas using photographic language, and interpret and create meaning through an understanding of form, content, and context.

    The lessons encourage collaboration and inquiry-based learning so that students may connect personally with photographs made by both their peers and master photographers. These students learn how to visually communicate their ideas, construct and defend their interpretations, create photographs with intention and meaning, and make self-published photobooks that share their stories. It will be the visually literate among us who will be the most effective communicators in the digital age, which is why Aperture Foundation is committed to helping young people strengthen their visual literacy, critical thinking, and communication skills.

    The Aperture On Sight curriculum is now available online as a free open resource for use in a variety of learning environments.

    Aperture’s program this year was offered at five locations, including Brooklyn Community Arts and Media High School (BCAM), Highland Park Community School, M.S. 136 Charles O. Dewey, Storefront Academy Harlem, and East Side Community High School.

    Aperture’s teaching artists include Community Partnerships Coordinator Alice Proujansky, Zalika Azim, Alexis Lambrou, Christopher Lopez, Pete Pin, and Emily Stewart. Additional support was provided by school staff members Trayisha Adams, Gordon Baldwin, Kyle Heyward, Leigh Klonsky, Sarina Maros, Sarah Monteleone, James O’Brien, and Nida Sahr. Aperture’s Education staff includes Deputy Director Sarah McNear, Manager of Public Programs and Education Ashley Strazzinski, and Education Work Scholar Emily Stewart.

    The 2016/17 programs have been made possible with support from The Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation, The Bay and Paul Foundations, and The Pinkerton Foundation. Additional public support is provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts with the Support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with City Council and Grand St. Settlement. The curriculum aligns with the national Common Core standards for college readiness and the New York City Blueprint for Teaching and Learning in the Arts.

    nea_dca_logos

    Image: Photo by Nezha H., Grade 11, East Side Community High School

  • Jun 7

    Stephen Shore in Conversation with Peter Kayafas

    Aperture Gallery and Bookstore

    547 West 27th Street, 4th Floor

    New York,NY

    This event is free for students with ID and Aperture Members at the $50 level and above.

    Join Aperture for a conversation with Stephen Shore and Peter Kayafas—director of the Eakins Press Foundation and photographer, curator, and teacher—about Shore’s newest publication Stephen Shore: Selected Works, 1973–1981.

    Stephen Shore’s Uncommon Places is indisputably a canonic body of work—a touchstone for those interested in photography and the American landscape. Remarkably, despite having been the focus of numerous shows and books, including the eponymous 1982 Aperture classic (expanded and reissued several times), this series of photographs has yet to be explored in its entirety. Over the past five years, Shore has scanned hundreds of negatives shot between 1973 and 1981. In this new volume, Stephen Shore: Selected Works, 1973–1981, Aperture has invited an international group of fifteen photographers, curators, authors, and cultural figures—from Wes Anderson to Hans Ulrich Obrist—to curate selections of ten photographs each from this new cache of images. Each portfolio offers an idiosyncratic and revealing commentary on why this body of work continues to astound; how it has impacted the work of new generations of photography and the medium at large; and proposes new insight on Shore’s unique vision of America as transmuted in this totemic series.

    Peter Kayafas is a photographer, publisher, curator and teacher who lives in New York City where he is the Director of the Eakins Press Foundation. His photographs have been widely exhibited, and are in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art; the Brooklyn Museum of Art; The New York Public Library; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the New Orleans Museum of Art; and the Art Institute of Chicago, among others. He has taught photography at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn since 2000. In addition to two other monographs (The Merry Cemetery of Sapanta and O Public Road! Photographs of America) his most recent book Totems, with an essay by Jed Perl, is available from the Purple Martin Press.

    Stephen Shore has had a significant influence on more than one generation of artists and photographers. He is the director of the photography program at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York. A major retrospective of Shore’s work is planned to take place at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 2017.

  • Jun 13

    Stephen Shore at Dashwood Books

    Dashwood Books

    33 Bond St.

    New York,

    Join Stephen Shore at Dashwood Books for a signing of his latest publication Stephen Shore: Selected Works, 1973–1981.

    Stephen Shore’s Uncommon Places is indisputably a canonic body of work—a touchstone for those interested in photography and the American landscape. Remarkably, despite having been the focus of numerous shows and books, including the eponymous 1982 Aperture classic (expanded and reissued several times), this series of photographs has yet to be explored in its entirety. Over the past five years, Shore has scanned hundreds of negatives shot between 1973 and 1981. In this new volume, Stephen Shore: Selected Works, 1973–1981, Aperture has invited an international group of fifteen photographers, curators, authors, and cultural figures—from Wes Anderson to Hans Ulrich Obrist—to curate selections of ten photographs each from this new cache of images. Each portfolio offers an idiosyncratic and revealing commentary on why this body of work continues to astound; how it has impacted the work of new generations of photography and the medium at large; and proposes new insight on Shore’s unique vision of America as transmuted in this totemic series.

    Stephen Shore has had a significant influence on more than one generation of artists and photographers. He is the director of the photography program at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York. A major retrospective of Shore’s work is planned to take place at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 2017.

  • Jun 16

    Richard Renaldi Manhattan Sunday Opening Reception

    Aperture Bookstore

    547 West 27th, 4th Floor

    New York,NY

    Join Aperture Foundation for the opening reception of Manhattan Sunday, with photographs by Richard Renaldi.

    Featuring photographs taken in Manhattan between midnight on Saturday and noon on Sunday, Manhattan Sunday is an homage to New York’s nightlife and a celebration of New York as palimpsest onto which millions of people project their ideal and imaginary lives. Richard Renaldi’s visual observations are rooted in the home he found himself, in “the mystery and abandonment of the club, the nightscape, and then finally daybreak, each offering a transformation of Manhattan from the known world into a dreamscape of characters acting out their fantasies on a grand stage.”

    Richard Renaldi (born in Chicago, 1968) graduated from New York University with a BFA in photography in 1990. Manhattan Sunday (Aperture, 2016) is the fourth body of Renaldi’s work published in book form, following Figure and Ground (Aperture, 2006), Fall River Boys (2009), and Touching Strangers (Aperture, 2014). In 2015, he was named a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow in Photography.

    Image: Richard Renaldi, 5:14. Courtesy Richard Renaldi and Benrubi Gallery.