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Roaming Without End

February 21st, 2018

A group exhibition in Paris navigates documentary strategies in a directionless world.

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  • Feb 22 - Feb 25

    PHOTOFAIRS San Francisco

    Fort Mason’s Festival Pavilion

    2 Marina Blvd

    San Francisco,CA

    Aperture fans can enjoy a special 2-for-1 ticket offer: Visit https://www.photofairs.org/san-francisco/visitor/tickets and enter promotional code APERTURE2FOR1.

    First Look – Thursday, February 22: 5:00–10:00 p.m.
    Friday, February 23: 1:00–8:00 p.m.
    Saturday, February 24: 11:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.
    Saturday, February 24: 11:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

    Visit Aperture at PHOTOFAIRS | San Francisco—the cutting edge contemporary art fair dedicated to the photographic medium—returning to Fort Mason’s Festival Pavilion from February 22-25, 2018. The fair’s international focus and boutique curation create an excellent environment to discover and collect innovative works of art, while also offering an array of insightful public programs.

    For information, visit www.photofairs.org.

  • Feb 27

    Naoya Hatakeyama at Dashwood Books

    Dashwood Books

    33 Bond St.

    New York,

    Join Naoya Hatakeyama at Dashwood Books for a signing of his latest publication Excavating the Future City (Aperture/Minneapolis Institute of Art, 2018).

    For the past thirty years, Japanese photographer Naoya Hatakeyama has undertaken a photographic examination of the life of cities and the built environment. Each of his series focuses on a different facet of the growth and transformation of the urban landscape—from studies of architectural maquettes to the extraction and use of natural materials such as limestone, as it is quarried via explosive blasts and subsequently incorporated into the construction of new buildings. In particular, Hatakeyama has routinely returned to the Tokyo-Yokohama metropolis, exploring this ever-evolving urban sprawl from both below and above, mapping the growth and expansion of these sites over time. Additional series focus on other forms of human intervention with the landscape and natural materials, including factories and building sites in Japan and abroad. Finally, his most recent photographs of his hometown of Rikuzentakata, a fishing town that was almost completely destroyed by the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami, are also included—an ongoing series begun almost immediately following the disaster. These photographs hauntingly embody the death and rebirth of the city, manifesting a deeply personal connection to the ongoing intersection of geology, architecture, and time.

     

    Copublished by Aperture and the Minneapolis Institute of Art on the occasion of the exhibition Excavating the Future City: Photographs by Naoya Hatakeyama at the Minneapolis Institute of Art, March 4–July 22, 2018.

    Naoya Hatakeyama (born in Rikuzentakata, Japan, 1958) is included in some of the most important public collections in the U.S., Europe, and Japan. He co-represented Japan in the 49th Venice Biennale in 2001, and was given his first solo museum exhibition outside of Japan in 2002 at Kunstverein Hannover. He joined the architect Toyo Ito and others in their efforts on the Golden Lion award–winning exhibition Architecture. Possible here? “Home-for-All,” representing Japan in the 13th Venice Biennale of Architecture in 2012. The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art installed a solo exhibition in 2012, originally organized by the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography.

     

  • Feb 28

    Naoya Hatakeyama Talk & Book Signing

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    MEMBER EVENT

    INVITE ONLY

    Aperture Members are invited to a rare opportunity to meet Naoya Hatakeyama at a talk with the artist and Aperture’s creative director Lesley A. Martin. Naoya Hatakeyama: Excavating the Future City is a recent title published by Aperture.

    Naoya Hatakeyama (born in Iwate Prefecture, Japan, 1958) is included in some of the most important public collections in the U.S., Europe, and Japan. He co-represented Japan in the 49th Venice Biennale in 2001, and presented his first solo museum exhibition outside of Japan in 2002 at Kunstverein Hannover. Hatakeyama’s work was also included in Japan Society’s presentation of In the Wake: Japanese Photographers Respond to 3/11 in 2016, originally organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Excavating the Future City is copublished by Aperture and the Minneapolis Institute of Art (Mia) in conjunction with the artist’s first survey in the U.S., curated by Yasufumi Nakamori and on view at Mia this spring.

    Not an Aperture  Member? Become one today to receive an exclusive invitation to this talk and participate in other special events year round!

    Image: Naoya Hatakeyama, #08316, 1999, from the series Blast; from Naoya Hatakeyama: Excavating the Future City (Aperture/Minneapolis Institute of Art, 2018) © Naoya Hatakeyama

     

     

  • Feb 28

    Art & Incarceration

    Aperture Gallery and Bookstore

    547 West 27th Street

    New York,NY

    Panelists: Aliya Hana Hussain, Jesse Krimes, Joseph Rodríguez

    How does incarceration impact art making for incarcerated artists and non-incarcerated artists concerned with the criminal justice system? This panel brings together a range of artists and figures who facilitate art projects with incarcerated individuals.

    Moderated by Nicole R. Fleetwood, contributing guest editor of Aperture’s “Prison Nation” magazine.

    In a series of public programs that accompany the spring issue of Aperture magazine and the related exhibition, Prison Nation, photographers, writers, historians, and activists discuss the unique role photography, art, and storytelling play in understanding and creating a dialogue around the crisis of mass incarceration in the United States.

    Click here to see the full list of Prison Nation programming

    Nicole R. Fleetwood is associate professor in the Department of American Studies at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. She is currently completing a book on art and mass incarceration. Her two previous books are Troubling Vision: Performance, Visuality, and Blackness (2011) and On Racial Icons: Blackness and the Public Imagination (2015). Fleetwood is the recipient of awards and fellowships from NYPL’s Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers, American Council of Learned Societies, Whiting Foundation, Schomburg Center for Scholars-in-Residence, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and National Endowment for the Arts.

    Jesse Krimes
    is a conceptual artist who lives and works in Philadelphia. While serving a six-year prison sentence, he produced numerous bodies of work that have been exhibited at the Palais de Tokyo, Paris; the Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers University; and the Leonard Pearlstein Gallery of Drexel University, among other venues. After his release in 2014, he partnered with the Soze agency to cofound “Right of Return USA,” the first national fellowship dedicated to supporting formerly incarcerated artists. Krimes is currently a 2017 Robert Rauschenberg fellow and is represented by Burning in Water gallery in New York.

    Joseph Rodríguez
    is a documentary photographer born and raised in Brooklyn. He studied photography in the School of Visual Arts and in the Photojournalism and Documentary Photography Program at the International Center of Photography in New York City. He has worked at print and online news organizations, including National Geographic, the New York Times Magazine, and the BBC. Rodríguez has been awarded Pictures of the Year by the National Press Photographers Association and the University of Missouri, in 1990, 1992, 1996, and 2002. He is the author of five books, and his photographs have been exhibited worldwide. He is represented by Galerie Bene Taschen.

    Aliya Hana Hussain is an advocacy program manager at the Center for Constitutional Rights, where she manages advocacy and campaigns challenging indefinite detention at the US military prison in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, and the profiling and targeting of Muslim, Arab, and South Asian communities. Her work focuses on developing new and creative partnerships with artists, musicians, and activists to bring the stories and artwork of CCR clients to new platforms and audiences. Her essay “Storytelling #Guantanamo” was published in Obama’s Guantánamo: Stories from an Enduring Prison.

    Image: Joseph Rodríguez, At Walden House FOTEP (Female Offender Treatment Employment Program), a young mother holds her son, El Monte, California, 2008; © the artist

    Aperture magazine’s “Prison Nation” issue and the related exhibition and programs are funded, in part, with generous lead support from the Ford Foundation, as well as funding from the Reba Judith Sandler Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the Grace Jones Richardson Trust, and the Board of Trustees and Members of Aperture Foundation. Additional public funds are from the National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

  • Mar 7

    Architecture of Confinement

    Aperture Gallery and Bookstore

    547 West 27th Street

    New York,NY

    Panelists: Bruce Jackson, Johnny Perez, Laurie Jo Reynolds, and Stephen Tourlentes

    This panel considers incarceration from an architectural perspective and how photographers engage with prisons as omnipresent structures in the American landscape. Moderated by educator and activist, Shana Agid.

    In a series of public programs that accompany the spring issue of Aperture magazine and the related exhibition, Prison Nation, photographers, writers, historians, and activists discuss the unique role photography, art, and storytelling play in understanding and creating a dialogue around the crisis of mass incarceration in the United States.

    Click here to see the full list of Prison Nation programming

    Shana Agid is an artist/designer, teacher, and activist whose work focuses on relationships of power and difference in visual and political cultures. She is an assistant professor of arts, media, and communication at Parsons School of Design, where he teaches courses in artists’ books, letterpress, collaborative design, service design, and design and politics. Her own collaborative design and design-research practice focuses on exploring possibilities for self-determined services and campaigns through teaching and design research. He is also a book artist and letterpress printer.

    Bruce Jackson is a photographer, filmmaker, ethnographer, novelist, and narrative theorist. He is SUNY Distinguished Professor and James Agee Professor of American Culture at SUNY Buffalo, and an associate member of New York’s Wooster Group. He is a Chevalier in France’s Ordre des Arts et des Lettres and Ordre national du Mérite. He was a Guggenheim Fellow and a member of the Harvard Society of Fellows. He has authored thirty-seven books, the most recent of which are Inside the Wire: Photographs from Texas and Arkansas Prisons (2013), American Chartres: Buffalo’s Waterfront Grain Elevators (2016), and Terlingua Necropolis (2017).

    Johnny Perez is the director of the US Prison Program for the National Religious Campaign Against Torture, a membership organization committed to ending US-sponsored torture and cruel, inhuman, and degrading treatment. He adds value, insight, and leadership to existing campaign efforts working to end the torture of solitary confinement, while building the capacity of religious leaders and directly impacted communities to engage in education and advocacy in the United States. Drawing on the wisdom of thirteen years of direct involvement with the criminal justice system, Perez also works to change its unjust policies and practices through his participation as a newly appointed member of the New York Advisory Committee to the US Commission on Civil Rights. He is also a member of the NYC Bar Association’s Corrections and Community Reentry Committee and is on the board of directors of both SPACE on Ryder Farm and the Juvenile Law Center.

    Laurie Jo Reynolds is an artist and policy advocate whose work challenges the demonization and exclusion of people both inside and outside of prison. She was the organizer of Tamms Year Ten, a grassroots legislative campaign to close Illinois’s notorious state supermax, which Governor Pat Quinn shuttered in 2013. She continues to collaborate with long-term prisoners and people with records on policy change. Reynolds has received grants from Open Society Foundations, Creative Capital, United States Artists, and Creative Time, and is an assistant professor of art at University of Illinois at Chicago.

    Stephen Tourlentes is an artist based in Boston, where he teaches in the photography department at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design. He is the recipient of artist fellowship grants from various organizations, including the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, Artadia: The Fund for Art and Dialogue, the Mass Cultural Council, the MacDowell Colony, and the Banff Centre for the Arts. His work has been exhibited in many museum and gallery venues and is held in many public and private collections. He has been a longtime advocate for implementing alternatives to mass incarceration.

    Image: Stephen Tourlentes, Wyoming State Death House Prison, Rawlins, Wyoming, 2000; Courtesy the artist and Carroll and Sons, Boston

    Aperture magazine’s “Prison Nation” issue and the related exhibition and programs are funded, in part, with generous lead support from the Ford Foundation, as well as funding from the Reba Judith Sandler Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the Grace Jones Richardson Trust, and the Board of Trustees and Members of Aperture Foundation. Additional public funds are from the National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

  • Mar 14

    Member Preview of Taysir Batniji: Home Away from Home

    Aperture Gallery and Bookstore

    547 West 27th Street, 4th Floor

    New York,NY

    Not an Aperture Member? Join Aperture’s membership program to get closer to the best in photography.

    On behalf of the Fondation d’enterprise Hermès, in partnership with Aperture Foundation, Aperture Members are cordially invited to a preview and reception of Home Away from Home by Taysir Batniji, the third recipient of Immersion, a French American Photography Commission. Palestinian French artist Taysir Batniji brings together photographs, selections from family archives, drawings, and writings to explore the sense of dislocation and the different ideas of “home” experienced by various members of his family who immigrated to the United States from the Middle East.

    6:00 p.m. – Preview reception

    6:30 p.m. – Introduction by Aperture’s executive director Chris Boot, creative director Lesley A. Martin, and Taysir Batniji

    7:00-8:30 p.m. – Public Opening

    The work Batniji has created during visits to Florida and California strives to connect to and understand his “American cousins” through their daily lives, the objects that surround them, and the homes they have made. The resulting photographs and portraits, interviews, and sketches from memory of the family homestead in Gaza question what it means to share a history—even among relative strangers—and what happens to a sense of past and of belonging when opting for new identities and homes. Home Away from Home is a singular and intimate portrait of Batniji’s own familial diaspora.

    Taysir Batniji (born in Gaza, 1966) trained as a painter at An-Najah National University, Nablus, prior to continuing his studies in France at the École Nationale Supérieure d’Art de Bourges, and the École Supérieure d’Art et de Design Marseille-Méditerranée. His work incorporates drawing, video, photography, and installation, and has been shown widely in Europe and the Middle East, including at the Venice Biennale; Jeu de Paume, Paris; Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin; Kunsthalle Wien; and Witte de With, Rotterdam.

    Aperture exhibitions are funded, in part, with support from the Board of Trustees and Members of Aperture Foundation. Additional public funds are from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

  • Mar 14

    Taysir Batniji: Home Away from Home

    Aperture Gallery and Bookstore

    547 West 27th Street, 4th Floor

    New York,NY

    Join Aperture and the Fondation d’entreprise Hermès for the opening reception of Home Away from Home by Taysir Batniji, the third recipient of the Immersion, a French American Photography Commission program. Palestinian French artist Taysir Batniji brings together photographs, selections from family archives, drawings, and writings to explore the sense of dislocation and the different ideas of “home” experienced by various members of his family who immigrated to the United States from the Middle East.

    The work Batniji has created during visits to Florida and California strives to connect to and understand his “American cousins” through their daily lives, the objects that surround them, and the homes they have made. The resulting photographs and portraits, interviews, and sketches from memory of the family homestead in Gaza question what it means to share a history—even among relative strangers—and what happens to a sense of past and of belonging when opting for new identities and homes. Home Away from Home is a singular and intimate portrait of Batniji’s own familial diaspora.

    Taysir Batniji (born in Gaza, 1966) trained as a painter at An-Najah National University, Nablus, prior to continuing his studies in France at the École Nationale Supérieure d’Art de Bourges, and the École Supérieure d’Art et de Design Marseille-Méditerranée. His work incorporates drawing, video, photography, and installation, and has been shown widely in Europe and the Middle East, including at the Venice Biennale; Jeu de Paume, Paris; Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin; Kunsthalle Wien; and Witte de With, Rotterdam.

    Aperture exhibitions are funded, in part, with support from the Board of Trustees and Members of Aperture Foundation. Additional public funds are from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

  • Mar 22

    Looking Again: Photography at the New Orleans Museum of Art

    New Orleans Museum of Art

    One Collins C. Diboll Circle

    New Orleans,LA

    Join Aperture and the New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) for a lecture with Russell Lord, Freeman Family Curator of Photographs, Prints, and Drawings, celebrating the launch his forthcoming book, Looking Again: Photography at the New Orleans Museum of Art (Aperture/NOMA, 2018). Following the discussion will be a book signing.

    For more information about the event, visit noma.org.

    Looking Again is as much about photography as it is about the specific photographs reproduced within it. It is designed to provide the reader with a glimpse into both the collection at the New Orleans Museum of Art and into photography’s complexity. Through 131 objects and essays, Russell Lord explores the many histories of photography, addressing long-held beliefs and offering new ways of thinking about, and looking at, photographs. As the world moves increasingly toward an image-dependent style of communication, there has never been a better time to seriously examine our belief in or apprehension toward the photographic image. Standing on the threshold of what might be a turning point in humanity’s relationship to the photograph, this volume encourages the reader to dig deeply into photography: to look, and then look again.

    Russell Lord is the Freeman Family Curator of Photographs at the New Orleans Museum of Art. He previously held positions at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Yale University Art Gallery. His deepest area of expertise is the origins of photography, but he has written and lectured widely on almost every moment in the history of photography. Lord’s recent publications include Gordon Parks: The Making of an Argument (2013), and contributions to Photorealism: Beginnings to Today (2014) and East of the Mississippi: Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Photography (2017). His recent exhibitions include Photography, Sequence, and Time (2012), Ten Years Gone (2015), and Something in the Way: A Brief History of Photography and Obstruction (2016–17). Much of his research focuses on the relationships between photography and other visual media.

  • Mar 27

    Artist Talk: Sable Elyse Smith

    Aperture Gallery

    547 West 27th Street

    New York,N.Y.

    Aperture Foundation, in collaboration with the Photography Program at Parsons School of Design, of The New School, is pleased to present an artist talk with Sable Elyse Smith. Smith, known for her work across photography, video, poetry, and performance, calls attention to the personal consequences of mass incarceration in the United States, and how these confining structures in society invisibly shape our minds and direct our bodies. Her recent artist’s book Landscapes & Playgrounds (2017), featured in Aperture’s “Prison Nation” issue, is a meditation on the complex language and emotional landscapes embedded in a system of surveillance. Smith’s work has been presented most recently in Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon at the New Museum and in the solo exhibition Ordinary Violence at the Queens Museum in New York. She is a 2018 artist in residence at the Studio Museum in Harlem.

    Sable Elyse Smith is an interdisciplinary artist, writer, and educator based in New York. Her practice considers memory and trauma while enacting an undoing of language. Her work has been featured at the Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, the New Museum, the Studio Museum in Harlem, SIGNAL Gallery, Rachel Uffner Gallery, and Recess Assembly, New York; Yerba Buena Center for the Arts and Artists’ Television Access, San Francisco; and Birkbeck Cinema in collaboration with the Serpentine Galleries, London. Her writing has been published in Radical Teacher, Studio Magazine, and Affidavit, and she recently published her first book. Smith has received awards from Creative Capital, Fine Arts Work Center, the Queens Museum, Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Rema Hort Mann Foundation, the Franklin Furnace Fund, and Art Matters. She is currently part-time faculty at Columbia University School of the Arts and visiting faculty at Virginia Commonwealth University in the Sculpture and Extended Media department.

    Image: Sable Elyse Smith, untitled, 2017; Courtesy the artist and JTT Gallery

    Aperture magazine’s “Prison Nation” issue and the related exhibition and programs are funded, in part, with generous lead support from the Ford Foundation, as well as funding from the Reba Judith Sandler Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the Grace Jones Richardson Trust, and the Board of Trustees and Members of Aperture Foundation. Additional public funds are from the National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

  • Apr 7

    AIPAD: Future Gender

    AIPAD

    711 12th Avenue

    New York,NY

    How have trans and gender-nonconforming individuals used photography to imagine new expressions of social identity? Zackary Drucker, guest editor of Aperture magazine’s landmark issue “Future Gender,” will lead a discussion on transgender lives, histories, and communities in photography, from the 1970s-era images of performer Marlow La Fantastique to a festival in India for members of the third gender.

    Featuring Zackary Drucker, Producer of the television series Transparent, Artist, and Activist; Amos Mac, Founding Publisher of Original Plumbing magazine; Nick Sethi, Artist; and Diana Tourjee, Co-Founder, Flawless Sabrina Archive and Staff Writer, Vice.