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Aperture’s 2015 Year in Review

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William Klein, Who Are You, Polly Maggoo?, 1966

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Camera Mainichi, April 1965, photograph by Yoshihiro Tatsuki

Frida by Ishiuchi #50, 2012

Ishiuchi Miyako, Frida by Ishiuchi #50, 2012

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Mike Kelley, Extracurricular Activity Projective Reconstruction #32, Plus, a Performa commission, 2009. Photograph by Paula Court and courtesy Performa

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Amalia Ulman, Excellences and Perfections, 2014

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Portrait of Bernd and Hilla Becher, 1985. Courtesy of Sonnabend Gallery

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Pages from Cristina de Middel’s The Afronauts (self-published, 2012)

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Hal Fischer, Gay Semiotics, 1977 © and courtesy Hal Fischer, and Cherry and Martin, Los Angeles

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Unknown photographer, Kansas dust Storm, barren earth, 1935. Courtesy Le Bal, Paris

As 2015 enters its twilight, we look back at a selection of features in Aperture magazine, from in-depth conversations with William Klein and Miyako Ishiuchi to articles covering a secret history of Japanese photography to how artists today disrupt Instagram’s conventions, plus much more.

Interview with William Klein: The legend on forgettable fashion, a dream starring Jean-Luc Godard, and his life in photography.

Magazine Work: Ivan Vartanian on finding the Japanese avant-garde amidst the techie and raunchy.

Interview with Ishiuichi MiyakoOn the occasion of a retrospective at the Getty Museum, Ishiuichi considers photography as sex, history, and memory.

When is an image more than a document?Roxana Marcoci and RoseLee Goldberg on photography and performance.

Self-Portraiture in the First-Person AgeLauren Cornell on the ways artists disrupt Instagram’s conventions.

Hilla Becher (1934-2015)Brian Wallis remembers an iconic figure.

The Lives of OthersStanley Wolukau-Wanambwa on photobooks and troubling representations of Africa.

Gay Semiotics RevisitedHal Fischer discusses his 1977 examination of the “hanky code.”

A Handful of DustDavid Campany charts the strange career of a surrealist photograph.

On the Nature of Photographs: In this article from Aperture’s new digital archive, Luc Sante and Stephen Shore discuss the essential qualities of photographs.

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